Pablo Picasso’s painting “Nude in a rocking chair” 1956, is a great representation of expressive modernism. As I have indulged into Modernism in the past few weeks it would be only fitting to describe what makes “Nude in a rocking chair” 1956, the oil painting,”modernist”.

From my knowledge, I currently understand Modernism to be a form of reacting to the dominant mode or tradition happening at the time. It also became an art of confrontation towards the current world and established a massive rejection of the 19th Century society and the art which appear in that period. When looking at “Nude in the rocking chair” 1956,  anyone can get lost in it. Whether it could be due to utter confusion of the faceless figured female  or the white body surrounded by dark strokes of black outlines contrasting the background with such vibrant and dominating colours. The absence of colour within the disintegrated female makes the image created to stand out. It expresses one’s inner beauty in a vastly driven and electric world.

naked-font-b-woman-b-font-in-the-rocking-font-b-chair-b-font-pablo-picasso

Modernism was daring when talking about or indicating sexual references. This painting hints at Modernism’s rejection against Romanticism. The salient figures position expresses emotional tension as well as aggression and sexual presences. Through doing this Picasso breaks the conventions of what was accepted at the time as he positions the faceless figured female upon a chair made of rams horns which symbolise a sexual facade. Picasso always achieved the breaking of conventions of what was accepted. He did so by challenging what artists saw as able-bodied by creating a faceless persona revealing the inner most soul to it’s outermost beauty.

http://www.artgallery.nsw.gov.au/collection/works/66.1981/

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5 thoughts on “#5 “Nude in a rocking chair”, Modernist?

  1. Hi Annaliese
    What an enthusiastic blog, you’ve really demonstrated your understanding of Picasso’s painting. I really liked how you related Picasso’s art to the modernist era and how it represents its features of modernism. The depthful analysis of his painting really gave me a different perspective of the piece.
    Gabs xx

    Like

  2. Hey Annaliese,

    I admire this interpretation because you point out all the different aspects such as the various forms, shapes and features within the painting. You state that “The salient figures position expresses emotional tension as well as aggression and sexual presences…Picasso breaks the conventions of what was accepted at the time as he positions the faceless figured female upon a chair made of rams horns which symbolises a sexual facade.” I agree with this as he was beyond unqiue with his expression, use of colour and texture in which he develops an underlining meaning behind the painting itself. He focuses on the inner soul of the human and portrays it to be mixed up, abstract and as some people may view it – grotesque which is quite different from many of the other paintings as they tend to usually display a unrealistic beauty in things or as we want to see it from a shallow level. I would just like to also say that maybe you should have also looked into how the painting reflects on Piccasso and his own personal relationship with this painting as I see much of him in it.

    Overall, great work! You really did analyse this well 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Hi Anneliese,

    Just found this post….great assessment of a great painting!!…Nude in a Rocking Chair is actually one of my favorites. On my first blog after I decided to take up my brush again, the tension of the pose is what I’m aiming for….you verbalize that quite beautifully…

    Lito

    Liked by 1 person

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